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Features & Articles from our Magazine Archive as well as materials written and collated by our staff.

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A collection of road tests collected from various sources including our Magazine Archive.

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Manuals to assistance in the repair and service of a vehicle.  The manuals are accessible if you are a Dues-Paying Members only.

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Technical Info & Specifications

Technical Information and Specifications Including AMA Info

Pre World War II Models

1928 Pontiac Six Roadster

Model A

1903 – 1904

1928 Pontiac Six Roadster

Model AC

1904

1928 Pontiac Six Roadster

Model B

1904 – Year

1928 Pontiac Six Roadster

Model C

1904 – Year

1928 Pontiac Six Roadster

Model F

1905 – Year

1928 Pontiac Six Roadster

Model

Year – Year

Post World War II Models

Ford 1960 falcon station wagon

Station Wagon

1929 – 2005

Ford 1960 Fairlane

Fairlane

1955 – 1970

1960 Ford thunderbird

Thunderbird

1955 – 1997
2002 – 2005

1960 Ford ranchero

Ranchero

1957 – 1979

1960 Ford Galaxie Four Door Hardtop (Post)

Galaxie

1959 – 1974

1960 Ford falcon

Falcon

1960 – 1970

1928 Pontiac Six Roadster

Ford 300

1963 Only

Ford 1960 Fairlane

Ford Custom

1964 – 1972

1960 Ford thunderbird

Mustang

1964½ – Current

1960 Ford thunderbird

LTD

1967–1986

1960 Ford thunderbird

Maverick

1969–1979

General Brand History

Years Manufactured

1903 – Current

World Head Quarters

Dearborn, Michigan USA

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The Tabs Below Have Historical Information from Specific Years
**Scroll above section to see the models built by year

 

 

 

 

 

 

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from Specific Years

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1903 – Ford Model A is the first car produced by the Ford Motor Company, beginning production in 1903. The car was either a two-seater runabout for $800 or the four-seater tonneau model with an option to add a top for $900.

1904 – The Model C is introduced. It was a revision of the Model A with a more modern appearance. It had a slightly more powerful engine and a 6.0″ longer wheelbase. Also in this year the Ford Model B was offered. It was an upscale touring car with polished wood and brass trim. The Model B was Ford’s first car to use the front-engine layout, with a large 24 hp 4-cylinder engine positioned at the front behind a conventional radiator.

1905 – The Ford Model F is introduced. It was a development of the Model A/Model C, but was larger, more modern, and more luxurious. Production ended in 1906 after about 1,000 were made. The Model F was a four-seater phaeton with running boards and a side-entrance tonneau standard.

1906 – The Ford Model K was introduced this year and replaced the earlier Model B. This model was aimed at the top end of the market and featured an inline-6 giving 40 HP. The wheelbase was 120.0″ and was offered as a touring or roadster. The Model K sold well. In 1906 the Model K produced over 85 percent of Ford Motor Company’s new car profit.

1907 – The Model K sold almost 500 examples in this year, making it the best-selling six-cylinder model in the world. The Model N appeared in this year. It was a front-engine car with a four-cylinder engine, diverging from the Model A, C, and F. Its 15 HP I-4 drove the rear wheels via a long driveshaft. The Model N had a wheelbase of 84.0″. 7,000 Model Ns were made before production ended in 1908. The Model R was a higher trim level of the Model N with a larger body, wheels covered by full fenders, running boards, and an oil lamp. It was a 1-year offering and 2,500 were delivered. Sold alongside it was the Model S. It had fenders attached to running boards, and a mechanical oiler. Differences from the R included Model N-style 28-inch tires and the pointed trunk.

1908 – The Model S Roadster was based on the same chassis as models N, R, and S runabout before it. The S Roadster had an enclosed cowl,  full fenders and fender aprons, and a third “rumble” seat.

1909 – The Model S continued to be sold as Ford prepared for the iconic Model T. 3,750 S Roadsters were sold between 1908 and 1909. Model T production begins. 10,666 Model Ts produced.

 

 

1910Model T production almost doubles to 19,050. After assembling nearly 12,000 Model Ts, Henry Ford moved the company to the new Highland Park complex.

1911 – Acetylene gas flame headlights continued to be used because the flame is resistant to wind and rain. Production grows to 34,858.

1912 – Mibnor running changes, not outward change in appearance. 68,773 are produced.

1913 – The moving assembly line system, which started on October 7, 1913, allowed Ford to reduce the price of his cars and increase production. This is apparent in the 170,211 Model T’s produced – over double the previous year.

1914 – Last year of the original body/chassis design. The “any color so long as it is black” policy finally implemented. Production reaches 202,667.

1915 – The hood design is nearly the same five-sided design with the addition of louvers to the vertical sides. The windshield relocated significantly behind the firewall and joined with a compound-contoured cowl panel.  Production is 30 times 1909 numbers at 308,162.

1916 – Electric headlights replaced carbide headlights. Production exceeds one-half million in one year – at 501,462.

1917 – The hood design was changed to a tapered design with a curved top – sometimes referred to as the “low hood” to distinguish it from the later hoods. Production increased by one-third to a record of  735,020.

1918 – The 1917 design  was used the longest and during the highest production years, accounting for about half of the total number of Model Ts built.  Production dropped to 664,076 – still a huge number of vehicles for the time.

1919 – Small running changes. Units dropped again to only 498,342 produced.

 

1920 – Ford changed their fiscal year to December in this year. This impacted the low number produced in 1919, and increased the total Model T production  – with two numbers reported 941,042 for 1919-20 and 463,451. Biggest news was the price drop from $500 to $395.

1921 – Smal running changes – Huge increase in production to 971,610.

1922 – Last year of old body design. 1,301,067 were sold.

1923 – The taper of the hood was increased and the rear section at the firewall is about an inch taller and several inches wider than the previous design. While this is a relatively minor change, the most significant issue was that parts between the third and this fourth generations are not interchangeable. This was the largest single year of production at 2,011,125.

1924 – Small running chjanges, last configuration in the works. 1,922,048 Model Ts produced.

1925 – Last year of older design. Production still at high levels at 1,911,705.

1926 – This last design change made  a great difference in the appearance of the car as Ford realized the looks were aging. The hood was again enlarged, with the cowl panel no longer a compound curve and blended much more with the line of the hood. The distance between the firewall and the windshield was also increased significantly. 1,554,465 produced

1927 – Production ended mid-year as Ford retools for the new Model A. Only 399,725 were delivered.

1928 – The Ford Model A was first produced on October 20, 1927, but not introduced to the public until December 2. It was designated a 1928 model and was available in four standard colors. 633,594 Produces.

1929 – New models introduced, icluding a Town Car and Station Wagon. Production goes up to 1,507,132.

1930 – Larger 4.75 tires on smaller 19.0″ wheels along with wider fenders, and a deeper radiator shell contributed to a fresh new look. A new Victoria model was introduced along with a deluxe version of the phaeton. Production was 1,155,162.

1931 – The last year of Model A production featured revised styling and several new body types. The radiator shell had a relief effect and the running boards were fitted with single piece splash aprons. A revamped cabriolet model was also introduced along with a convertible sedan which had fixed side window frames over which the top rode up or down on a set of tracks. Calendar year production was 541,615.

1932 – On March 31, 1932, Ford announced their new V-8. The V-8 was developed in extreme secrecy under Henry Ford’s close personal supervision.  The classic radiator shell was slightly veed and carried vertical bars. Positioned in the center of the curved headlight tie-bar was Ford’s V-8 logo. Somewhat overwhelmed by the response to Model 18, the four-cylinder Model B shared the same body as the V-8, less the V-8 logos. Calendar year production was 287,285

1933 – Now with a longer 112.0″ wheelbase and X­ member double-drop frame, the Model 40 Ford had valanced front and rear fenders, a new radiator design with vertical bars slanted back to match the rear sweep of the windshield and acorn-shaped headlight shells. All models, regardless of body color, were delivered with black fenders and 17.0″ wire spoke wheels. A new dash arrangement with a reshaped engine-tuned panel enclosing the gauges was directly in front of the driver. 334,969 Fords were produced.

1934 – Visual changes for 1934 were minor. Different V-8 hubcap emblems  were used and the side hood louvers were straight instead of curved.  he 1934 grille had fewer vertical bars and its chrome frame was deeper and flatter. The V-8 grille ornament was placed within an inverted 60 degree triangle carried a vertical divider. The fenders were painted in body color on all models. Production was 563,921.

1935 – The narrower radiator grille lost its sharply veed base and helped accentuate the 1935 model’s new, lower and more streamlined appearance. Fender side hood louvers received three horizontal bright stripes. The headlight shells were body color.  Ford offered a built-in trunk for its two- and four-door models. A convertible sedan was added to the Ford model, and the Victoria was no longer available. 942,439 were delivered.

1936 – Fords retained the same basic body of the 1935 models but had a restyled front end and new rear fenders.  The convertible sedan received “trunk-back” style. Standard wheels were now pressed steel with 12-inch painted hubcaps and chrome centers. Changes for 1936 included a larger capacity radiator, new hood side louvers and front vents, and helical-cut gears for first and reverse gears. 791,812 produced.

1937 – These Fords were the first to have their headlights mounted in the fenders and to have an all-steel top. The Ford’s styling reflected the strong influence of the Lincoln Zephyr. The grille with horizontal bars and a center vertical bar cut a sharp vee into the side of the hood. A smaller version of the V-8 with a 2.60″ bore and 3.125″ stroke for 136 CID and 60 hp The engine was available only in the Standard models. Production was 848,608.

1938 – Ford adopted a new marketing strategy for 1938 in which its Standard models carried the same basic front sheet metal used in the previous year while the Deluxe models were given a revised appearance. A curved grille outline with horizontal bars and a separate set of side hood louvers distinguished the Deluxe models. The Standard grille had horizontal bars that extended into the side hood region. A new instrument panel with a centrally located radio speaker grille and recessed control knobs was added. 1938 pro­duction: 410,048

1939 – Standard and Deluxe models were continued with the former using the styling of the 1938 Deluxe. Standards had a sharply veed grille with horizontal bars, headlights mounted inboard of the fenders and small side hood louvers. The Deluxe models had teardrop-shaped headlights blended into the front fenders and a grille set low in the hood. Simple chrome trim replaced the hood louvers, and a smooth body profile was featured. The most significant technical development was fitting Lockheed hydraulic brakes. Production was 532,152.

1940 – Fords continued to feature handsome styling by Eugene Gregorie. Deluxe models had chrome headlight trim rings with the parking light part of its upper surface. Its grille combined a center section with horizontal bars. All were fitted with sealed beam headlights and a steering column-mounted shift lever. The 85 hp engine was part of the Deluxe package, optional on the Standard. Both models had front vent windows. The Standard’s grille and hood were like 1939 Deluxe models. This was the final year that the smaller V-8 60 was available. 599,175 were produced.

1941 – Fords had fresh styling and a revamped chassis. All sat on a 2.0″ longer wheelbase of 114.0″. A wider body had increased interior dimensions. A new three-piece grille had a vertical center section with two auxiliary units set low on either side. Running boards were continued but due to the body’s greater width were far less noticeable than on earlier Fords. The headlights were further apart in the fenders. There were three models Super Deluxe, Deluxe, and Special. All Fords were available with either the V-8 engine rated at 90 hpr a new 226 CID I-6 that was also rated at 90 hp. 600,814 Fords were produced.

1942 – The 1942 Fords were redesigned, now with concealed running boards and new front fenders and hood. A new grille design featured a narrow center section in conjunction with side grilles considerably larger and more squared off than 1941. The Super Deluxe cars had bright trim around the windshield, rear window and side windows. Crank operated front vent windows were new. A revised frame that was lower by one inch was fitted. Lower and wider leaf springs, a two-inch wider tread and dual lateral stabilizer bars were added. Deluxe model grille frames were painted body color. Specials had even less trim. The final 1942 model Fords were produced on February 10, 1942. Only 43,407 1941 Fords were produced.

1943 – 1946 – During World War II, Ford Motor Company produced a variety of military equipment and vehicles, including: 

  • 390,000 tanks and trucks
  • 27,000 engines
  • 270,000 Jeeps
  • Over 8,000 B-24 Liberators
  • Hundreds of thousands of parts, gun mounts, and machine tools
  • 277,896 vehicles, including tanks, armored cars, and General Purpose Willys (GPW) reconnaissance vehicles

1947 – On April 7th Ford Motor Company suffered a great loss with the death of its founder, Henry Ford.

1948 – This year brought the introduction of the F-1 Half ton pickup. The F-1 was a narrow truck with large round headlights and a narrower hood than the front grille. Ford advertised the F-1 as “Bonus Built,” suggesting that it was so well made that it gave customers added value for their money.

1949 – The ’49 was the first new American car design since World War II. The 1949 Ford had a unique design with a wind tunnel-tested aerodynamic shape, integrated pontoon fenders, and an airplane-inspired spinner grille. The model line became known as the “Shoebox Ford” because of its slab-sided “pontoon” design.

1950 – The 1950 Ford models appeared similar to the 1949 models, but they claimed to have incorporated “50 improvements for ’50.” Some of these enhancements included a recessed gas filler neck, redesigned hood ornaments, a flattop horn ring, a three-bladed cooling fan, and push-button handles on exterior doors. Additionally, the serial numbers now included an assembly plant designation for the first time.

1951 – The 1951 Ford models retained body components from the 1949-1950 models, but significant visual changes were introduced. The grille featured a horizontal bar, and the single large spinner was replaced by two smaller spinners positioned at the ends of the bar. Minor redesigns were applied to the taillight lenses and the reshaped license plate cover. The interior saw a complete transformation with a new instrument panel, and all instruments were now grouped in front of the driver.

1952 – In 1952, Ford introduced a completely new body design, the first since 1949. The updated models showcased a one-piece curved windshield, a full-width rear window, protruding round parking lights, a round three-bladed spinner at the center of the grille bar, a simulated scoop on the rear quarter panels, a concealed gas filler pipe and neck behind the license plate, and a redesigned instrument panel. Additionally, the clutch and brake pedals were suspended in this model.

1953 – In 1953, Ford continued to use the 1952 bodies with some moderate trim updates. The grille featured a larger horizontal bar, flanked by three vertical stripes on each side of a large spinner. The length of this bar was extended, wrapping around the front edges of the fenders. The parking lights were now rectangular instead of round. The steering wheel hub showcased the Ford crest, which included the words “50th Anniversary 1903-1953.”

1954 – In 1954, Ford continued to use the 1952-1953 bodies with some moderate trim updates. The grille now featured a large horizontal bar with substantial slots on either side of a centrally located spinner, and round parking lights were positioned at each end of the bar. Notably, new convenience options were introduced for 1954, including power windows, four-way power seats, and power brakes. The front suspension saw the replacement of king pins with ball joints. The major highlight from Ford Division in 1954 was the introduction of a new V-8 engine with overhead valves, boasting a rating of 130 hp, representing nearly a 25 percent increase over the 1953 flathead engine.

1955 – In 1955, Ford underwent a complete redesign, both inside and out, differing significantly from the 1954 version. The bodies were longer, lower, and wider. While the 1955 models retained the backlit speedometer introduced in 1954, the rest of the instrument panel was entirely new. The top trim level now featured a new Fairlane series, replacing the Crestline. The front showcased large round parking lights in a concave grille beneath the headlights. The Ford crest appeared above the word “Fairlane” on the front hood and on the doors above the chrome Fairlane stripe, which extended from the top of the front fenders, over the doors, and to the rear of the car. The Fairlane series also included chrome eyebrows on the headlight doors. Responding to the contemporary interest in horsepower and speed, Ford introduced two new, larger overhead valve V-8 engines. Additionally, on October 22, 1954, Ford unveiled the all-new 1955 two-passenger Thunderbird, with a base price of $2,695.

1956 – In 1956, Ford continued to use the 1955 body, with the main difference being the top configuration on two-door hardtops each year. New models included the Fairlane-level Parklane two-door sport wagon and a Customline Victoria two-door hardtop. Oval parking lights replaced the round units from the 1955 models, and there were moderate revisions to the chrome trim. The 1956 models featured larger taillights with chrome rings around the lenses. Inside, the 1956 models were entirely new, with a redesigned instrument panel focusing on safety. Optional padding and padded sun visors were introduced, and the steering wheel had a 2-1/2-inch recessed hub designed to reduce driver injury in case of an accident. For the first time in 1956, seat belts were offered as an option.

1957 – In 1957, Ford introduced a completely restyled lineup with the Fairlane series (including Fairlane and Fairlane 500 models) being five inches lower and having a longer wheelbase, while the Custom series (including Custom and Custom 300 models) was three inches longer overall. All models had 14-inch wheels for the first time. Design changes included a rear-opening hood, streamlined wheel openings, and the use of windshield posts that sloped rearward. The 1957 Fords featured tailfins, referred to as “high-canted fenders” by Ford. The notable introduction was the Skyliner, the only true hardtop convertible in the world, with an automatic folding mechanism retracting the top into the trunk at the touch of a button.

1958 – In 1958, despite sharing a basic body with the 1957 models, Ford introduced several new styling features. Notable changes included a simulated air scoop hood and honeycomb grille inspired by Thunderbird stylists, giving the car a more futuristic appearance. The addition of a sculptured rear deck lid and dual headlamps further contributed to the updated look. Additionally, the 1958 models introduced the Cruise-O-Matic three-speed automatic transmission for the first time, along with 332-cid and 352-cid V8s. A unique feature exclusive to 1958 was the Ford-Aire suspension system, available only for Fairlane series cars and station wagons.

1959 – The 1959 Fords are widely regarded as the most beautifully styled models ever built, earning them the Gold Medal for Exceptional Styling at the Brussels World Fair. In contrast to other car manufacturers emphasizing futuristic or supersonic aesthetics, Ford opted for elegance and understated class. The rear fender feature lines were subtly swept to the back, housing back-up lights and curving around an oversized taillight. The front end featured flattened fenders with dual headlights and a sculptured effect at the sides. These Fords were characterized by their long, low profile, exceptionally flat hood, minimal chrome trim, and vibrant colors. The introduction of a new 430 cid/350 hp V-8 engine in Thunderbirds and the Galaxie series with a Thunderbird-inspired roofline added to the overall appeal. The Galaxie, introduced as a top-line model, showcased beautiful results by adapting the Thunderbird roofline to the standard Fairlane 500 body.

1960 – Ford underwent a complete redesign, sharing nothing with previous models except engines and drivelines. The controversial styling, although divisive, is regarded as one of Dearborn’s smoothest designs. The new models were longer, lower, and wider, featuring a distinctive chrome strip running from the front bumper to the rear, emphasizing a restrained look. The Fairlane series had Ford word and four cast stripes for trim, while the Galaxie series featured a Ford crest in script. Additionally, the introduction of the Falcon marked Ford’s entry into the compact car race, characterized by pleasing and simple styling in two-door and four-door variants, as well as station wagons.

1961 – Ford underwent its third major restyling of the full-size lineup in three years. The lower body was completely new, while the upper body structure was retained from the 1960 lineup. The front-end styling featured a full-width concave grille with a horizontal dividing bar. The Ford name in block letters replaced the crest on Fairlane models, and series designations appeared on the front fenders. The 1961 models replaced the previous year’s horizontal full-length fin with a smaller canted fin resembling those from 1957-1958 Custom series cars. Large round taillights and a horizontal chrome strip, similar to 1960 models, were retained. The Galaxie series featured a ribbed aluminum stone guard. Ford entered the horsepower race with the introduction of the 390 cid/401 hp V-8 engine. The Falcon remained mostly unchanged from 1960, with only an updated convex grille. The Thunderbird series underwent significant changes, replacing the “Square Bird” with a longer, more rounded design. The front bumper surrounded a stamped aluminum grille with a horizontal grid pattern. A chrome strip outlined small, canted fins, and four cast stripes were stacked in front of the taillights. The smooth deck lid replaced the sculptured lid used in previous years, and two large round taillights replaced the six used in 1960. Additionally, Cruise-O-Matic transmission, power steering, and power brakes became standard on all Thunderbirds starting in 1961.

1962 – Ford made significant styling changes to the Galaxies and full-size line, resulting in a cleaner design. The slab-sided body featured a horizontal feature line at the beltline, with the model designation in script along the rear fender. Large round taillights were maintained across the lineup, separated by a stamped aluminum panel on Galaxies. The full-width grille with a horizontal grid pattern, capped by dual headlights, and the Ford crest at the front of the hood characterized the front end. The Falcon line remained mostly unchanged, with an updated grille and additions like the wood-grained Falcon Squire in the Deluxe series and the Futura two-door sedan bucket seat sport model. The 1962 Thunderbirds had minor cosmetic changes, featuring a smooth hood without ridges and slightly different taillights with a chrome ring. The significant introduction in 1962 was the intermediate-size Fairlane, shorter than the Galaxie but longer than the Falcon. Despite its size, the Fairlane retained Ford’s characteristic design elements, including round taillights, ‘high canted’ fenders, and a grille similar to the Galaxie line. The year marked the continuation of the horsepower race, with Ford introducing the famous 406 cid/405 hp V-8 and a new line of small V-8 engines, starting with a 221 cid base V-8 of lightweight design.

1963 – Ford underwent a complete restyling of its full-size lineup for the fifth consecutive year. The sides were devoid of sculpture lines, except for the beltline feature. The model designation appeared in script behind the front wheel opening, and large round taillights were mounted at the top of the rear fenders. The Galaxie 500 series featured a stamped aluminum escutcheon panel. The trunk lid displayed the model designation in block letters. The full-width grille, with a horizontal grid, included a large Ford crest serving as the hood release, while ‘FORD’ was spelled out in block letters on the hood. Notably, the 1963 models saw the replacement of the old 292-cid Y-block with the famous small-block 260-cid and 289-cid engines. As other automakers escalated the horsepower race, Ford introduced its most powerful engines to date: the 410 hp and 425 hp 427-cid big-blocks.

1964 – Ford continued its six-year trend of total restyling, applying changes across the lineup from the compact Falcon to the prestigious Thunderbird. Despite significant restyling, engine choices remained largely unchanged. The revolutionary Ford Mustang, introduced in 1964, offered a range of features and options, catering to different tastes and budgets. It was a small, sporty, and affordable car that inspired other ‘pony cars,’ with various engine options from a 170-cid six to a 289-cid V-8. Standard equipment included bucket seats, wheel covers, and a heater. The Mustang, introduced as a midyear model, set records that remain unbroken.

1965 – Ford introduced the expansive ‘Total Performance” lineup, featuring 44 models across five car lines, marking the broadest selection in Ford Division’s history. The full-size Fords, promoted as the ‘Newest since 1949’, emphasized luxury and comfort, showcasing notable changes such as rear coil springs, new interior styling, and ‘Silent Flow’ ventilation systems. The restyled full-size Fords had clean lines, square shapes, and a distinctive grille with thin horizontal bars and vertical dual headlights. The Galaxie 500 LTD Interior trim option debuted, reflecting a new luxury image. Engine designations were displayed on the front fender for optional V-8 engines. The 1965 Mustang introduced a 2+2 fastback modelin addition to the Coupe and Convertible, replaced the 170-cid engine with the 200-cid one, and added various minor changes and new options such as door handles, nameplates, door lock buttons, disc brakes, GT Package, and racing stripes. Standard equipment included six or eight-cylinder engines.

1966 – Ford continued its practice of significant restyling across various model lines. The full-size Fords from 1965 and 1966, though sharing some similarities, are distinct cars, with the hood being the only interchangeable exterior body component. The 1966 models featured more rounded lines compared to the previous year while maintaining similar feature line placements. The 1966 Mustang underwent minor changes in the grille and trim but achieved strong sales. It adhered to new safety standards and included standard features like seat belts, instrument panel, heater, and mirrors. Available with six or eight-cylinder engines, it featured bucket seats, wheel covers, and a special ventilation system in the fastback model.

1967 – Ford continued its tradition of restyling at least one model line, with full-size Fords undergoing a complete redesign, sharing only drivetrains with the 1966 models. The new design featured rounded shapes, including rounder tops and fenders, while retaining stacked quad headlights and introducing a completely new grille. Thunderbirds also underwent a complete restyling, featuring a full-width grille, hidden headlights, and a prominent Thunderbird emblem at the front, and a distinct ‘Landau Sedan’ model with unique rear doors, colloquially known as ‘suicide doors’. The Mustang was redesigned with a larger and more aggressive look, featuring a bigger grille, scoop, and taillights, offering various standard and optional features and five engine options, ranging from a 200-cid six to a 390-cid V-8.

1968 – Ford made notable changes, restyling only one of its lines after a decade. The full-size Fords retained the 1967 body shells with updated front ends, while the new grille featured hidden headlights, a honeycomb design, and a central vertical bar. Rooflines became more formal, and taillights were horizontally divided by back-up lights. Safety regulations added front and rear fender marker lights. The powerful 427-cid V-8 engine was detuned to 390 hp, and midyear saw its discontinuation, replaced by the famous Cobra Jet 428 and Super Cobra Jet 428 V-8s. The ‘385’ series engines, displacing 429 cid, became the top power option in big Thunderbirds. The 1968 Mustang maintained the 1967 body but featured a floating emblem, a cleaner scoop, and less trim.

1969 – Ford introduced several new products, including the Cobra in the Fairlane series, representing Ford’s performance line. A significant midyear addition was the Maverick, positioned as direct competition to the Volkswagen and priced at $1,995, becoming Ford’s only model under $2,000. Emphasizing economy, Ford promoted the Maverick’s fuel efficiency, claiming an average of 22 mpg. Interestingly, unveiled on April 17, 1969, the Maverick coincided with the fifth anniversary of the Mustang’s successful launch. The 1969 Mustang was larger and more striking, featuring quad headlights and rear-facing side scoops. It offered powerful engines like the Mach I, Cobra Jet, Boss 302, and Boss 429, designed for speed and racing enthusiasts.

1970 – Ford expanded its lineup by introducing more models within each series. The full-size Fords received minimal restyling, mainly focusing on the rear end with repositioned taillights and an updated grille. The 1970 Mustangs featured single headlights, larger grilles, and flat taillights, along with new engines like the 351-cid ‘Cleveland’ V-8. The Mustang lineup included models like Grande, Convertible, Mach I, and Boss 302, each with distinctive features and equipment.

1971 – Ford underwent significant changes, including restyling two model lines and introducing the sub-compact Pinto. The Fairlane model and ‘FE’ series big-block V-8 engine were discontinued. The 1971 Mustangs featured a new design with a full-width grille and hidden wipers, offering models like Sports roof, Grande, Mach I, and Boss 351, each with unique features such as spoilers, hood scoops, racing mirrors, and powerful engines.

1972 – Significant restyling only occurred for the Torino and Thunderbird model lines, while others remained unchanged or had minor trim adjustments. All engines were mandated to run on regular gasoline with a maximum compression ratio of around 9.0:1. The transition from brake horsepower to SAE net horsepower rating was notable, with the 351 ‘Cleveland’ V-8 still delivering nearly 300 net horsepower, making it one of the most powerful engines that year. However, pollution regulations, higher insurance rates, and lower compression ratios drew a close to the Ford muscle car era. The 1972 Mustangs, resembling previous models, featured a new color-keyed front bumper and chrome script on the rear. Available in styles like hardtop, Sportsroof, convertible, Grande, and Mach I, they included standard features such as concealed wipers, racing mirrors, and bucket seats, along with various engine options like the Cleveland 351-cid V-8.

1973 – Full-size Fords underwent significant restyling, while other models received minor trim updates. The year saw the introduction of federally mandated safety requirements, including large ‘park bench’ safety bumpers. Tightened pollution standards led to de-tuned engines and emissions control equipment, resulting in lower performance and fuel efficiency. The Arab oil embargo heightened fuel economy concerns, leading manufacturers to prioritize mileage over performance. The 1973 Mustangs featured minor changes from the previous year, such as a new grille design, color-matched bumper, and additional wheel and tire options. The Mustang convertible was a rare and popular model. Different Mustang versions, like the Grande and Mach I, offered unique features such as vinyl roofs, tape striping, hood designs, and suspension packages.

1974 – Ford made minimal changes to the 1973 models, focusing on luxury and safety enhancements. New safety regulations mandated large rear bumpers, increasing car weight by nearly 350 pounds. This, coupled with tightened pollution standards, resulted in generally slower 1974 models. Pintos and Mavericks lacked innovation, and V-8 engines were limited in other lines. Torinos offered various engine options, while Thunderbirds discontinued the powerful ‘429’ engine. The 1974 introduction of the Mustang II presented a smaller, more economical version with a blend of European and American design elements. It came in four models with diverse features, including engines, transmissions, brakes, tires, mirrors, upholstery, and roof options.

1975 – Ford models were largely similar to the previous year, with some restyling on the full-size Fords, including a larger Mercedes-style grille and new taillights. A notable change was the replacement of the two-door hardtop model with a coupe featuring fixed quarter windows and large ‘opera’ windows. The Gran Torino became the Elite, while the Maverick and Pinto underwent minor grille updates. The new Granada series was introduced, offering a resemblance to Mercedes-Benz and various customization options. Thunderbird remained mostly unchanged, with a slight modification to the steering wheel. All 1975 cars were required to use unleaded gasoline due to stricter pollution standards, with many featuring catalytic converters. The Mustang II saw few changes from 1974 to 1979, with 1975 updates including a moonroof, V-8 engine, and a new steering wheel. Different versions, such as the Ghia coupe and Mach I fastback, offered various features and options.

1976 – What is important

1977 – What is important

1978 – What is important

1979 – What is important

List Info by Year and tabs by Decade

1999 – What is important

List Info by Year and tabs by Decade

1999 – What is important

List Info by Year and tabs by Decade

1999 – What is important

List Info by Year and tabs by Decade

1999 – What is important

List Info by Year and tabs by Decade

1999 – What is important

Ford’s Amazing Small Block

Ford’s Amazing Small Block

We can look back at the forty-plus years that the 221-351 Ford V8 was installed in cars – not to mention that you can still...

Acquisitions, Partnerships, and Mergers

1939 Ford creates the Mercury Brand

Mercury was a brand created by the Ford Motor Company in 1938 to slot between the mainstream Ford brand and the luxury Lincoln brand. The purpose of Mercury was to offer consumers a mid-priced option with features and styling that bridged the gap between Ford and Lincoln.

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Cultural References

Movie “Ford V Ferrari” August 30, 2019

A sports drama film directed by James Mangold, released in 2019. The movie revolves around the intense rivalry between the American automotive giant, Ford, and the iconic Italian sports car manufacturer, Ferrari, during the 1960s. The story primarily follows automotive visionary Carroll Shelby, played by Matt Damon, and fearless British driver Ken Miles, portrayed by Christian Bale. Together, they are tasked with building a revolutionary racing car to challenge Ferrari’s dominance at the prestigious 24 Hours of Le Mans race. The film beautifully captures the dynamics of friendship, corporate pressure, and the pursuit of excellence in the high-stakes world of competitive racing. With its captivating storytelling, superb performances, and adrenaline-pumping racing sequences, “Ford v Ferrari” is a cinematic triumph that appeals to both racing enthusiasts and general audiences alike. See the Preview Here

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Brand Marketing

Includes Print Ads,  Press Releases, Sales Brochures, Posters,  Cards, Dealer Sheets, and other Artwork.

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Factory Documents

Includes Bulletins, Parts Catalogs, Owners Manuals, Stylist Drawings, and other information created by the manufacturer for informational and other purposes.

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Features and Articles

Features & Articles from our Magazine Archive as well as materials written and collated by our staff.

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Road Tests

A collection of road tests collected from various sources including our Magazine Archive.

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Service Manuals

Manuals to assistance in the repair and service of a vehicle.  The manuals are accessible if you are a Dues-Paying Members only.

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Technical Info & Specifications

Technical Information and Specifications Including AMA Info

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